Florida West Coast Woodworkers

Serving Sarasota, Manatee, Charlotte Co

Month: July 2013

June General Meeting: some pix from June 12, 2013

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Floyd Yoder speaks on clamps and their use in woodworking: “Cee what I mean?”

Floyd Yoder gave an informative talk based on his own experiences with clamps, including sharing some of his favorites that he uses in his work everyday.  During an informal question and answer session, the question of removing dried glue on the clamps came up.  The June audience offered that the clamps could be waxed with wax, or a layer of waxed paper could be inserted between the clamp and the work.  Alternately, the clamps could have a layer of blue painter’s tape applied and easily removed after the glue up is finished.  One member offered that he just lets the glue dry, and then it is removed by hitting it sharply.

Floyd offered that his least favorite clamp type is the one-handed clamp which met with much disagreement from the June membership, and a friendly debate ensued.  Floyd’s experience was that the one-hand clamps do not offer enough clamping power, and there was further disagreement on that point, but it all comes down to a matter of personal preference.

For a bar clamp bar graph, refer to the March 2013 Wood Magazine (issue 217) page 43 in which a total of eleven clamping results are tabulated.  There the editors laid out an assortment of bar clamps along with the tested average clamp force in pounds.  Clamps are available in all ranges, from the DeWalt Medium with a test force of 72 pounds to the Irwin Quick-Grip XP600 with a tested force of 386 pounds.  This issue in not yet available for download in digital form or available for purchase in paper format at woodmagazine.com/store.  Wood magazine has not yet granted permission to see the entire chart on our website, so if you have to, beg, borrow, or steal a copy from your friend!

John Darovec with his flute

John Darovec with his flute

While John has the full run of his shop, he worked on this flute that he brought to show and tell.

Denny's flat segmented bowl

Denny’s flat segmented bowl

Denny brought in a bowl he made from flat segments.  I am going to have to interrupt show and tell to get better pictures of this work, so patience please,-ed.

 

June winners

June winners

Leslie, Denny, Jeff, Floyd, John, and Rick are the June winners.  Note the preponderance of prizes from our sponsor, Woodcraft in Tampa!

 

While Denny finishes recuperating, Harold Haines offered his shop for a turning demonstration.  Sorry I couldn’t make it Harold.  Anyone have a few pictures from that meeting?  I can try to post them if they are emailed to the webmaster.

Content and original photographs provided by Andrew DiLorenzo.

President’s Message for July

It’s the end of July and time to look back.

John Slezak did a nice presentation on shop safety at our general meeting.  22 members and 3 guests listened as John spoke of accidents and dangerous levels of noise and pollutants.  There are many devices that will help protect us, and we should make use of them.   Talk with him if you have concerns about your safety or someone else’s.  Thanks, John.

On the 15th, Denny hosted the Turners’ Meet.  He amazed us with his tilted bowl made of closed segments.  It looks like he made good use of the time when his shoulder wasn’t healed enough for him to work at his lathe.  When else would someone measure and make the multitude of precise cuts required for this unusual piece of art?  Is it done yet?  Thanks, Denny.

This month’s Shop Meet was held at Tony D’Alberto’s.  Good eats; good company; good conversations.  Thanks, Tony.

Coming events in August:  On the 14th, we will have a general meeting about finishes, presented by our own members.  On the 19th, Denny will host another Turners’ Meet.  And on the 26th, Andy DiLorenzo will host the Shop Meet.

Susan

 

President’s message for June

Sue with a bowl she turnedMany clubs in Florida take time off in the summer, when the snowbirds have left for the north and many locals are taking vacations out of state. We continue to meet and enjoy ourselves; we just have fewer members than usual at our meetings. Only 24 members and one guest, Jeff Unthanic, came in June.

We who were there were treated to a well-paced, thorough, presentation on clamps by Floyd Yoder. We learned about clamps from antique to brand new, from tiny to huge, and from nearly free to very expensive. He brought clamps made from wood, plastic, and metals; of various shapes and sizes; and ones that close up in different ways. With each example, Floyd explained what kind of clamping he would use it for, and described its ease of use and drawbacks. Anyone can go to the store and look at the display of clamps, and experienced woodworkers like Floyd know what they’re looking at. Now we know too.

Only three members reported during Show & Tell, another indication of how the weather affects us. John Darovec showed the pieces he has made for his clarinet; Denny Wetter showed a spirally segmented platter; and Harold Haines brought an album of pieces he had made prior to joining our club.

The Turners’ Meet was held at Harold Haines’ house/garage/shop. Harold does segmented turning, and he had many examples of his work, most of which are closed segments. In his garage/shop, he showed everyone his ShopSmith, which is what he works on, having donated his other equipment to schools before he moved to Florida.

Larry Simmons hosted the Shop Meet on the 24th. Another hand tool, in addition to planes, that Larry is working to master is the hand saw, and he showed us several that he has acquired. After demonstrating the different cuts by a couple of saws, he encouraged people to try the saws themselves. We can look forward to a club presentation next year on this topic.

Thank you, Harold and Larry, for hosting these events.

See you all in July,

Susan

July 10 Show and tell and raffle winners.

Lowel with his cast in resin and turned North Island Pind

Lowel with his cast in resin and turned North Island Pine

Denny Wetter with one of his symposium award winning segmented bowls

Denny Wetter with one of his symposium award winning segmented bowls

Intarsia Egret with one of the few pieces Joe makes where he colors some of the wood.  (This photo says to me that it would be better if some of the items were photographed by themselves and full screen rather than sharing the screen with the creator-any ideas here would be appreciated.-ed.)

Intarsia Egret with one of the few pieces Joe makes where he colors some of the wood. (This photo says to me that it would be better if some of the items were photographed by themselves and full screen rather than sharing the screen with the creator-any ideas here would be appreciated.-ed.)

John demonstrates a lock miter joint.

John demonstrates a lock miter joint.

Mike show off his table saw cut-off fixture with hdpe runners for smoothness.

Mike show off his table saw cut-off fixture with hdpe runners for smoothness.

Ed show his cabinet made after James Krennov.  Joinery was by dowels and no sandpaper was used.  (Hey guys, stand still for a minute will you? -ed.)

Ed show his cabinet made after James Krennov. Joinery was by dowels and no sandpaper was used. (Hey guys, stand still for a minute will you? -ed.)

Ed brought in his new glue that cures in the absence of air.

Ed brought in his new glue that cures in the absence of air.

Terry showed of his wooded mosquitoes, here being bagged up so they don't fly away!

Terry showed of his wooded mosquitoes, here being bagged up so they don’t fly away!

John told of meeting a local woodworker who make drums from palm trees.

John told of meeting a local woodworker who make drums from palm trees.

With the lucky numbers, were the following:

With the lucky numbers, were the following: Steve Krandal, Denny Wetter, Felix Travino, Floyd Yoder,
Ed Colombo, Harold Hines, Barry Taylor, Ed Frazer, and Jack Bradron.
Ed was the winner of the gift certificate from Woodcraft for the quarterly drawing.

July 10 General Meeting

John Slezak presents on shop safety

John Slezak presents on shop safety

 

Terry Bair lent his experienced hand to the gavel, as both Susan and Larry were out of town.  John Slezak presented us with his views on shop safety for the workshop by presenting a series of items available from Woodcraft and elsewhere.  In addition, his main message was to be aware of yourself and your surroundings.  He also shared two very scary incidents from his own experience, including an occurance of kickback on a table saw and a “catch” on a band saw that knocked him down!

(This is one of the best videos on table saw kickback on Youtube-warning don’t try this at home! –ed.)

1. John began his list of safety appliances by describing a magnetic motor starter as a switch that will not turn on if the power goes off and then comes back on.  Imagine if you thought the power was off and when the electricity returns, your power tool springs into action whether you are controlling it or not.  Also he mentioned a “plug for a plug” which serves the same function.  This is basically a black box that if power is interrupted, will not restore power to the tool that is plugged into it until that tool is turned off.

2. A first aid kit-make sure it is not just an empty box.

3. Hearing protection.  Both ear muff type of protectors and the foam compressible inserts were mentioned.

4. Push blocks (push sticks) help keep fingers away from moving blades.

5. Hold downs for the router table which can help maintain an even depth of cut as the work piece moves across the bit.

6. Push blocks for the jointer, in this case John showed a 16 inch long push block that could span the entire length of shorter work and keep you fingers away from the cutters.

7. A gripper was also brought in, with emphasis on its use on the table saw. Some members remarked that the gripper was also demonstrated at the Woodworking Show.  Don’t know what it is?  Click below. As the woodworker said, “On the other hand, I have all my fingers.”

8. It almost goes without saying that a small magnet is handy for starting small nails.

9. Tweezers-don’t get splinters without them. (Alternately, try a drop of wood glue, which when allowed to harden will fasten itself to the splinter.-ed)

10. Masks are available in different forms to control dust.  Some are disposable, some are refillable, look for a rating of N95 or N100 to filter out wood dust.  Some are even rated for pesticide use with the proper insert.

11. A variation on the mask is a deluxe model with an exhaust valve that closes when one breathes in.

12. A face mask for wood turners which acts as both safety glasses and a shield.  This is great for those who wear glasses or occasionally operate a weed eater.

13. Safety glasses-some glasses are impact resistant and add a measure of safety.  They are available now with built in magnifiers for those that know what diopter they require.

14. Face masks that cover the most part of one’s face and have powered air supply to help prevent fogging.

15. Safety gloves or protective hand wear for contact or chemical sensitivity.  Try the nitrile gloves if you are allergic to latex or need a little stronger glove.

16.  John also talked about the saw stop and how the saw stops working before it cuts a hot dog.  John is certified to repair these, when the brake mechanism discharges and has to be replaced.  Some of the history of the Sawstop story was related as well.  So far there is no retrofit for older or other saws, but for those in the market for a new saw this is something to be considered.  The video below is from Sawstop.

The next shop meet is at Tony’s place-hey what a nice guy. Tony will give you the shirt off his back, or another one if you ask nicely. The map link is on the home page and in the calendar.

Lowel Newland scheduled his shop for the November shop meet.

Terry Bair presented an article written by one of our previous presenters, the representative from Closetec, and it was suggested to post a copy on our web site. Since our resources page is so huge, it may be best to start a new page of links on a new resources page.

Content and original photographs by Andrew DiLorenzo.